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Thor: Love and Thunder Review – Marvel’s $250 Million Dollar Blunder

A one word review for Thor: Love and Thunder is BLUNDER.

Thor: Love and Thunder was in no ways going to outperform as I’ve already discussed in my previous posts. But after watching this movie, I’m disappointed, heartbroken and have nearly lost my faith in Marvel Studios.

It’s just a wonder that Marvel Studios and Kevin Feige green lit this movie. Thor: Love and Thunder topples Eternals and steals the title of the worst Marvel movie. This movie surely makes Doctor Strange: In The Multiverse of Madness feel like gold.

Here’s my in-depth review for this movie:

Director: Taika Waititi

Writers: Taika Waiti, Jennifer Kaytin Robinson

Cast: Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman, Christian Bale, Tessa Thompson, Taika Waiti, Russell Crowe, Jaimie Alexander, Chris Pratt, Dave Bautista, Karen Gillian, Pom Klementieff, Sean Gunn, Vin Diesel,Bradley Cooper, Carly Rees, Luke Hemsworth, Matt Damon, Idris Elba

Music: Michael Giacchino, Nami Melumad

Budget:  $250 Million USD

Genre: Action, Comedy, Adventure, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Superhero,

Synopsis:

Thor is hanging out with the Guardians now and he has given up the path of violence. Thor is searching for his true purpose and has chosen peace. His search for peace is interrupted when he comes to know about Gorr who is on a spree to kill all gods. In search of Gorr, Thor meets his ex-girlfriend Jane Foster who can now wield the Mjolnir.

Together they must stop Gorr before he does something utterly terrible.

Thor: Love and Thunder Review - Marvel's $250 Million Dollar Blunder
Image Source – Google | Image By – hypebeast.com

Thor: Love and Thunder Review

Thor: Love and Thunder starts with the opening scene of Gorr and how he stumbles upon The Necrosword. But right after that we see him only in glimpses. Then we see Thor with the Guardians and get a glimpse of how strong he is. He literally is capable of taking on small enemy groups by himself. The plot picks up soon as Thor leaves to search Gorr.

Overall, the plot gets straight onto the point but struggles to focus on any character. None of the characters ever struggle with themselves or while fighting. Jane Foster would be the exception since she’s already dying.

The biggest error with Thor: Love and Thunder would that instead of Mjolnir protecting Jane Foster, it was absorbing her immunity to fight against cancer. Mjolnir getting enchanted so easily is I think a joke on Asgardian mythology which Marvel developed in its early stages.

Thor: Love and Thunder also omits an important fact about Gorr killing the Gods that is Gods die permanently when killed with the Necrosword.

The script drives all the characters towards the end. It’s all about finishing the movie. None of the scenes develop the character or add purpose to them. Many sequences are questionable especially giving feelings to Stormbreaker.

Many of the jokes don’t land. Korg was a lot funnier in the previous installment but in this movie, he tries so hard to be funny but is not even able to put a smile on your face.

Overall, Thor: Love and Thunder is a terrible disaster and the worst Marvel movie.

Character Development

Don’t get me wrong, Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman and Christian Bale are fantastic in what the script offers their characters. They did their best but honestly the script had nothing to offer.

Thor

There isn’t any kind of character development for Thor. He’s probably as strong as he was during Avengers: Infinity War. The script of this movie is not written in the favor of Thor. This movie turns The Strongest Avenger into a goofed up joke. There are moments when he’s fantastic but overall Thor is confused if he should be funny or serious and ends up rather being stupid most of the time.

Jane Foster

There was no need for Marvel Studios to bring Jane’s character back. The only reason for this is her character wasn’t being around enough to pique an interest. That’s the reason that even when she summons the Mjolnir there isn’t enough build up for the audience to cheer.

But it is what it is. Jane’s action sequences are an eye candy. She’s terrific with Mjolnir. Which brings to the question, how did she learn to fight within moments? Throughout the movie she’s handling Mjolnir as as if she has practiced it her entire life. Thor: Love and Thunder doesn’t explain Jane Foster’s skills with the Mjolnir.

Gorr

Gorr doesn’t live up to his name in this movie. He’s just shown killing one god. If the script was longer, it could have explored Gorr more. Despite Gorr being dangerous, he doesn’t show any signs of violence. He’s more of a villain meant to scare children.

He was literally killing time towards the end so that Thor, Jane Foster and Valkyrie could be free.

Music

Thor: Love and Thunder is based on the 80’s and most of the background music is rock music from the 80’s. All the other background sound effects were absolutely accurate.

Cinematography

The cinematography of this movie is on and off. There are some pretty good sequences capture in a nice way. However, towards the end, the way the fighting scenes are edited are particularly weird.

Thor, Valkyrie and Jane Foster are captured by Gorr but Stormbreaker frees everyone in just a fraction of seconds? One second they’re tied the next second, everyone’s free and no explanation is provided.

Similarly, just after the action sequences which follow this scene is have various edits which don’t justify how things happen in the first place.

Direction

If a director ever chooses to make a movie for such a bad script then that itself is a big red flag. On top of that Taika Waititi decided to scrape off 2 hours of footage 30% of which could very well found its place in the movie.

Nothing about the direction is right for this movie. The director is supposed to be the coordinator for everything that happens for the movie. But here Waititi decided that a $250 Million Dollar movie could be a mainstream comedy. It doesn’t matter if the jokes don’t land but he still decided to go for a funny and light tone for this movie.

This would have been fine if there wasn’t going to be hardcore fighting with Gorr. But there is so that means that the fights are going to be friendly which is exactly how there were.

But keep everything on the right side of the scale and Jane Foster’s ‘Eat my hammer’ on the left side of the scale. The worthlessness of the left side is heavier than everything else.

The fact the Waititi allowed that to happen is itself the proof that superhero movies are not his thing.

Screenplay

The general purpose of sequels especially Marvel Studios’ sequels is to add more meaning to the characters and in the end make them stronger. But Thor: Love and Thunder terribly fails at this. Neither does this movie make Thor stronger nor does it add meaning to its character.

The sole purpose of this movie is to explore the relationship of Thor and Jane Foster while leaving Thor’s heart open to love in the end. It also redeems the long lost character of Jane Foster only to kill her. So, no Thor: Love and Thunder hardly contributes to everything what’s happens surrounding multiverse. It only leaves room for further battle of Gods with its first post credit scene.

Apart from that, the script really seems to be more of Disney movie’s script which is aimed for children.

Action/Effects

The action scenes of Thor: Love and Thunder are good and so are the effects. This movie is a very colorful movie. All sorts of bright color filters are used throughout the movie, even black and white.

The action scenes would have proved much more effective if the there was some violence. Most of the fight scenes were just weapons clashing.

Thor: Love and Thunder is a statement from Marvel Studios to lower your expectation from its future projects. This movie also put the down the bar for energy, excitement, plot, jokes and action scenes for a typical Marvel movie.

This movie is nowhere near the benchmark which Marvel has set in the past and is more of heart break and disappointment for many fans.

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